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The European Commission presented its plan to reduce EU greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels. This level of ambition for the next decade will put the EU on a balanced pathway to reaching climate neutrality by 2050.

The new target is based on a comprehensive Impact Assessment of the social, economic and environmental impacts. The Assessment demonstrates that this course of action is realistic and feasible. This raised ambition also underlines the EU's continued global leadership, ahead of the next UN climate conference (COP26).

The Commission:    tabled an amendment to the proposed European Climate Law, to include the 2030 emissions reduction target of at least 55% as a stepping stone to the 2050 climate neutrality goal; invited the Parliament and Council to confirm this 55% target as theEU's new Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) under the Paris Agreement, and to submit this to the UNFCCC by the end of this year; set out the legislative proposals to be presented by June 2021to implement the new target, including: revising and expanding the EU Emissions Trading System; adapting the Effort Sharing Regulation and the framework for land use emissions; reinforcing energy efficiency and renewable energy policies; and strengthening CO2 standards for road vehicles.

Alongside the 2030 Climate Target Plan and its Impact Assessment, the Commission has also adopted today an assessment of Member States' National Energy and Climate Plans for 2021-2030. The Commission's Assessment shows that the EU is on track to surpass its current 2030 emissions reduction target of at least 40%, in particular thanks to ongoing progress in deploying renewable energy across Europe. To reach the new goal of 55%, the EU will have to further increase energy efficiency and the share of renewable energy. This will now be subject to further consultation and analysis before legislative proposals are presented by the Commission in June 2021.

The new 2030 climate target will help to focus Europe's economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. It will stimulate investments in a resource-efficient economy, promoting innovation in clean technology, fostering competitiveness and creating green jobs. Member States can draw on the €750 billion NextGenerationEU recovery fund and the EU's next long-term budget to make these investments in the green transition. To support the necessary investments, the Commission has also adopted today the rules for a new EU Renewable Energy Financing Mechanism, to make it easier for Member States to work together to finance and deploy renewable energy projects.