La presente informativa è resa, anche ai sensi dell’art. 13 del D. Lgs. 196/2003 “Codice in materia di protezione dei dati personali” (“Codice Privacy”) 
e degli artt. 13 e 14 del Regolamento (UE) 2016/679 (“GDPR”), a coloro che si collegano alla presente edizione online del giornale Tribuna Economica di proprietà di AFC Editore Soc. Coop. 

Leggi di più

I TWEET

@GruppoBPER_PR nuovo assetto dell’area commerciale. Tre strutture sono il perno dei nuovi servizi al cliente… https://t.co/4lM6BROppy
notizie edizione online Federturismo Confindustria Ministero D. Confindustria Canavese https://t.co/szzGFiNCh6

 

Today, 21 September, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between the EU and Canada enters into force provisionally. It will only enter into force fully and definitively, however, when all EU Member States have ratified the Agreement. The Commission will work with EU Member States and

Canada to ensure its smooth and effective implementation.

What will CETA do?  CETA offers new opportunities for EU businesses of all sizes to export to Canada. It will save EU businesses €590 million a year – the amount they pay in tariffs on goods exported to Canada. As of 21 September CETA removes duties on 98% of products (tariff lines) that the EU trades with Canada. It also gives EU companies the best access ever offered to companies from outside Canada to bid on the country's public procurement contracts - not just at the federal level but at provincial and municipal levels, too.

The agreement will especially benefit smaller companies who can least afford the cost of the red tape involved in exporting to Canada. Small businesses will save time and money, for example, by avoiding duplicative product testing requirements, lengthy customs procedures and costly legal fees. Member States' authorities dealing with export promotion stand ready to help businesses to start exporting overseas, boost existing trade, and attract investment.

CETA will create new opportunities for European farmers and food producers, while fully protecting the EU's sensitive sectors. The EU has further opened its market for certain competing Canadian products in a limited and calibrated way, while securing improved access to the Canadian market for important European export products. Those include cheese, wine and spirits, fruit and vegetables, and processed products. CETA will also protect 143 EU "geographical indications" in Canada, high quality regional food and drink products.

The EU's 500 million consumers will also benefit from CETA. The agreement offers greater choice while upholding European standards, as only products and services that fully respect all EU regulations will be able to enter the EU market. CETA will not change the way the EU regulates food safety, including genetically modified products or the ban on hormone-treated beef.

The agreement also offers better legal certainty in the service economy, greater mobility for company employees, and a framework to enable the mutual recognition of professional qualifications, from architects to crane operators.

Moreover, EU Member States can continue to organise public services as they wish. A Joint Interpretative Instrument, which will have legal force, has further clarified this and other issues. It clearly and unambiguously outlines what Canada and the EU have agreed in a number of CETA articles.

Procedure and next steps.  The EU and Canada signed CETA on 30 October 2016, following the EU Member States' approval expressed in the Council. On 15 February the European Parliament gave also its consent. On 16 May 2017 the Canadian side ratified CETA. This paved the way for provisional application as soon as Canada adopted all the necessary implementing rules.

CETA will be fully implemented once all EU Member States ratify the deal according to their respective constitutional requirements. At the time CETA will take full effect, a new and improved Investment Court System will replace the current investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism that exists in many bilateral trade agreements negotiated in the past by EU Member States' governments. The new mechanism will be transparent and not based on ad hoc tribunals.

>