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The very last agricultural quota system in place, managing sugar production in the European Union, will be scrapped on 30 September 2017, after nearly 50 years.  The decision to end the sugar quotas now was agreed between the European Parliament and Member States in the 2013 reform of the

Common Agricultural policy (CAP) after a major reform and restructuring process initiated in 2006.

Between 2006 and 2010, the sugar sector had been thoroughly restructured with the support of €5.4 billion. As a result, the sector has been able to carefully prepare for this moment and productivity has improved substantially over the last years. The end of the quota system gives producers the possibility to adjust their production to real commercial opportunities, notably in exploring new export markets. It also significantly simplifies the current policy management and administrative burden for operators, growers and traders.

EU's continuing support for the sugar sector.  Various measures from the Common Agricultural Policy can be used to continue supporting the EU sugar sector to face unexpected disturbances on the market. This includes a substantial EU import tariff (outside preferential trade agreements) and the possibility to give support for private storage and crisis measures that would allow the Commission to take action in case of severe market crisis involving a sharp increase or decrease of market prices. Income support for farmers in the form of direct payments is also available, including the possibility for EU member states to provide so-called voluntary coupled support for sectors in difficulty, including sugar beet production.

The possibility to collectively negotiate value sharing terms in the contracts between EU beet producers and sugar processors is maintained after the end of the quotas.

 

The European Commission has also improved transparency on the sugar market in anticipation of the end of the quota system. A new Sugar Market Observatory provides short-term analysis and statistics about the sugar market, as well as analysis and outlook to help farmers and processors manage their businesses more effectively.