La presente informativa è resa, anche ai sensi dell’art. 13 del D. Lgs. 196/2003 “Codice in materia di protezione dei dati personali” (“Codice Privacy”) 
e degli artt. 13 e 14 del Regolamento (UE) 2016/679 (“GDPR”), a coloro che si collegano alla presente edizione online del giornale Tribuna Economica di proprietà di AFC Editore Soc. Coop. 

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Exports to the European Union from developing countries using special tariff preferences under the EU's Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) reached a new high of €69 billion in 2018. According to the European Commission's report published every two years on the GSP  exports to the EU from the 71 GSP beneficiary countries increased to almost €184 billion.

Nearly €69 billion of these used GSP special preferences.

The Generalised Scheme of Preferences removes import duties on developing countries' exports to the EU.  By creating additional export opportunities, it helps the countries to tackle poverty and create jobs while also respecting sustainable development principles. For instance, today's report shows that, thanks to the GSP, countries like Sri Lanka, Mongolia and Bolivia are more effectively tackling child labour.

The EU's trade agenda contributes to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals around the world. The preferences provide beneficiary countries with an incentive to take further steps towards effectively implementing international conventions related to human rights, labour rights, environment and good governance.

Challenges remain in many of the 71 GSP beneficiary countries, including when it comes to restrictions on civil society and freedom of the media, access to justice, minorities' rights, capital punishment and freedom of association.  Insufficient progress, including in some of the largest beneficiaries, has resulted in the EU increasing its monitoring and enhancing its engagement, in particular regarding human rights and labour rights.  In the case of Cambodia, this has led to the EU initiating the procedure to temporarily withdraw preferences because of the serious and systematic violation of the principles of core United Nations and International Labour Organization conventions. 

The report looks at the extent to which GSP countries make the most  of the scheme.  It also examines a number of overarching issues such as the freedom of civil society to operate, progress on tackling child labour, and environmental and good governance concerns.  The report gives examples of how the EU works with all stakeholders, such as civil society, international organisations – in particular the United Nations and International Labour Organization monitoring bodies – and beneficiary country authorities to make GSP more effective and to make sure that trade and values advance simultaneously.

EU industry is an important partner in making sustainable development a reality by investing and producing in, and sourcing from, GSP countries and by ensuring that international labour and environmental standards are met.