La presente informativa è resa, anche ai sensi dell’art. 13 del D. Lgs. 196/2003 “Codice in materia di protezione dei dati personali” (“Codice Privacy”) 
e degli artt. 13 e 14 del Regolamento (UE) 2016/679 (“GDPR”), a coloro che si collegano alla presente edizione online del giornale Tribuna Economica di proprietà di AFC Editore Soc. Coop. 

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Europeans would find it easier to give up flying to fight climate change (40%, compared to 43% in China and 38% in the United States) than to stop eating meat, buying new clothes, owning a car or using video streaming services. However, 39% of Europeans and 38% of Americans say that giving up their car would be the most difficult option.

These are some of the results from the second release of the 2020-2021 Climate Survey published by the European Investment Bank (EIB). The EIB is the lending arm of the European Union and the world’s largest multilateral lender for climate action projects.

Overall, only 10% of Chinese people and 19% of Europeans say they are making radical lifestyle changes to fight climate change, while as many as 27% of Americans say so.

Future travel plans to be shaped both by the pandemic and climate concerns

Once travel restrictions related to COVID-19 are lifted, 37% of Chinese people, 22% of Europeans and 22% of Americans say they will avoid flying because of climate change concerns. 42% of Europeans say they would take their holidays in their own country or a nearby country to minimise carbon emissions. 29% of Europeans (compared to 29% of Chinese people and 35% of Americans) say they will resume travelling by plane as they did before the pandemic.

When asked about COVID-19 and public transport, 75% of Americans, 71% of Chinese respondents and 67% of Europeans say they are currently less likely to use public transport because they are worried about their health.

A majority of respondents (79% of Chinese people, 67% of Americans and 58% of Europeans) say they are more concerned about catching COVID-19 than they are about the long-term impact of climate change.

A global comparison – differences between European, American and Chinese perceptions.    Regardless of where respondents live, people say that it would be easiest to give up flying to fight climate change (40% for Europeans, 38% for Americans and 43% for Chinese respondents).

Health concerns are also universal: 75% of Americans, 71% of Chinese people and 67% of Europeans say they are currently less likely to use public transport because they are worried about their health due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Even though most respondents say that they are more concerned about catching COVID-19 than about climate change (79% of Chinese people, 67% of Americans and 58% of Europeans), people still believe their choices and actions can contribute to the fight against climate change. 72% of Europeans believe that their own behaviour can make a difference in tackling climate change. This conviction is shared by 72% of Americans and 84% of Chinese respondents. The number of respondents answering positively to this question increased everywhere compared to 2019, with an increase of three points in the European Union, seven points in the United States and 12 points in China.

Younger respondents are considerably more likely to believe their behaviour can make a difference in fighting climate change compared to older respondents in Europe and in the United States, while this gap is not observed in China. The survey shows that in the European Union, 77% of 15-29 year-olds believe their behaviour can make a difference, compared to 64% of respondents aged 65 or older. In the United States, the figures are 75% of 15-29 year-olds compared to 56% of respondents aged 65 or older.